Big Hitch

Big Hitch KING OF THE HILL Two bull headed men a cowboy and an ex officer were locked in a struggle to see which one knew about horses But there was than personal pride riding on the Big Hitch six matched Cl

  • Title: Big Hitch
  • Author: John Henry Reese
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 291
  • Format: Hardcover
  • KING OF THE HILL Two bull headed men, a cowboy and an ex officer, were locked in a struggle to see which one knew about horses But there was than personal pride riding on the Big Hitch, six matched Clydesdale horses about to be entered in a tournament by a Kansas beer company Big money was at stake, but first the Big Hitch had to be trained and that s when thKING OF THE HILL Two bull headed men, a cowboy and an ex officer, were locked in a struggle to see which one knew about horses But there was than personal pride riding on the Big Hitch, six matched Clydesdale horses about to be entered in a tournament by a Kansas beer company Big money was at stake, but first the Big Hitch had to be trained and that s when the fists begun to fly This is the sweaty, boisterous, horse smelling story of hard men with tough reputations fighting to stay on top of what they did best This is the story of the training of a Big Hitch, six beautifully matched Clydesdale horses that compete in tournaments for a Kansas brewery whose beer sales depend on their success It is also a head on collision between a scruffy young cowboy and a giant, ex artillery officer in the British Army, whose rules as wagon master he challenges.Theirs is a struggle for than a job, for the incumbent, a stuffy, egocentric, braggart whose brilliant track record has suddenly begun to deteriorate, is also tacitly engaged to the brewer s headstrong granddaughter And his challenger, an unpolished but brilliant cowboy whose way with horses borders on the miraculous, soon finds his desire to produce a winning team giving way to his desire to win the girl s affections The result is a rollicksome adventure filled with great good humor and an immense amount of information about how to train horses and their drivers.

    • Big Hitch by John Henry Reese
      291 John Henry Reese
    • thumbnail Title: Big Hitch by John Henry Reese
      Posted by:John Henry Reese
      Published :2019-06-14T16:38:26+00:00

    About " John Henry Reese "

  • John Henry Reese

    Pseudonyms for this author include Cody Kennedy Jr and John Jo Carpenter John Reese in 1981 I have never cared what any critic said about my work and still do not I was never an author, but I was a production professional His output was remarkable He sold over 500 stories to the pulps, graduated to the slicks, and became the top freelance contributor to the Saturday Evening Post Doubleday published his first novel in 1943 and by 1980 he had written than 40 His list included many high original Westerns, especially the Jesus on Horseback trilogy, but he developed in other directions Big Mutt, is a best selling dog story for children, in print than 30 years winner of New York Herald Tribune Award, Children s Book, 1952 The Looters explores the world of organized crime and became a film by Universal Pictures Charley Varrick, 1973 Ten novels spotlight private investigator Jefferson Hewitt Another trilogy with This Wild Land chronicles the powerful and passionate Shepherd family on and made concessions to the then current appetite for sex and violence His production record alone stamps him as a notable writer, but he had other claims to high rating One would be originality An agent once described him as incredibly imaginative There is a strong element of disillusion in Reese s humor The antics of the human race left him confused and depressed After his years in politics and the newspaper business, he suspected that crooks and phonies outnumber the honest men in our world He thought that many of today s college graduates ought to be recalled as unsafe at any speed Observation told him that the noble red man was a myth and that tribal life was hell At the same time he respected courage and honor and loyalty The mixture of skepticism and faith adds a special tone to his work The flavor is sharpened by a high degree of literacy He was formidably self educated and called himself a nut about the English language He delighted in good prose and was a fine stylist himself From all this his principals as a writer emerge I always tell ambitious writers to be that if they haven t read, they can t write His second dictum If they haven t lived, they can t write He himself drew on an incredible reservoir of experience He headed James Roosevelt s campaign for governor, spent years as a Los Angeles newsman, and was at home in Hollywood Nothing like this happens to the young literati of today Reese fans contend that he was one of the equal or better known practitioners of his craft that in his own territory he was as good as they come Jack Smith quoted Reese when he wrote about him in the Los Angeles Times upon his death Many a time I have looked back over my career trying to find something in it worthwhile About all I remember with any pride was running Richard Nixon out of the City Hall pressroom I told him something like Go on, get out Nobody can square you with Van He says you have no guts and no principle and will probably go far Jack goes on to retell the story of how Reese received hundreds of calls at home for the Failure to Provide Deadbeat Dad Office of the District Attorney Seems his number was near that of the office He was a compassionate man and it shows in his work He couldn t bear to change his number stating There s something about the anonymity of a wrong number that seems to cloak it with the frankness of the confessional and all I can do is try to exhibit a little compassion myself when they want to talk to the wrong number god Reese asked Jack not to retell this and many other stories for fear it would hurt his reputation as a curmudgeon What he lacked in formal education, he made up for in integrity, honesty, loyalty and principal and, of course, a very colorful imagination Jack Smith further wrote Here s to an old grouch, and a very good man.

  • 627 Comments

  • This is a western that tells you things you didn’t know instead of repeating the timeworn clichés. True enough, the central character is a cowboy and “the worst no-account fool west of the Mississippi but the finest horseman anywhere.”He’s got his eye on a girl who’s his boss’s granddaughter, an independent-minded suffragist he lacks the class for. But further resemblance to the standard western formula ends there. The plot of the novel involves a “big hitch” of six matched Clyd [...]


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