Can a Robot be Human?: 33 Perplexing Philosophy Puzzles

Can a Robot be Human Perplexing Philosophy Puzzles With puzzles and paradoxes jokes and tall stories Peter Cave offers a witty investigation into of life s most important questions Teeming with fiendish but delightful logic Peter Cave s tales wi

  • Title: Can a Robot be Human?: 33 Perplexing Philosophy Puzzles
  • Author: Peter Cave
  • ISBN: 9781851686476
  • Page: 410
  • Format: Paperback
  • With puzzles and paradoxes, jokes and tall stories, Peter Cave offers a witty investigation into 33 of life s most important questions Teeming with fiendish but delightful logic, Peter Cave s tales will have you thinking and arguing about life and the universe From how to get into heaven to tortoises that cannot be outrun, this is a fresh take on philosophy s most fascinWith puzzles and paradoxes, jokes and tall stories, Peter Cave offers a witty investigation into 33 of life s most important questions Teeming with fiendish but delightful logic, Peter Cave s tales will have you thinking and arguing about life and the universe From how to get into heaven to tortoises that cannot be outrun, this is a fresh take on philosophy s most fascinating conundrums Prepare to be perplexed Can a nurdere be innocent Are you really unique What does it mean to be in love Can you ever believe anyone who says, I m telling the truth What seperates a saint, a sinner and a suicide bomber If it doesn t make you think, you re probably dead already Professor Timothy Chappell, The Open University A must read book Professor Imrie Leader, University of Cambridge.

    • Can a Robot be Human?: 33 Perplexing Philosophy Puzzles By Peter Cave
      410 Peter Cave
    • thumbnail Title: Can a Robot be Human?: 33 Perplexing Philosophy Puzzles By Peter Cave
      Posted by:Peter Cave
      Published :2019-03-01T12:38:02+00:00

    About " Peter Cave "

  • Peter Cave

    Peter Cave lectures in philosophy for The Open University and New York University London He frequently contributes to philosophy magazines and journals, lectures around the world, and has scripted and presented philosophy programmes for the BBC He is the author of eight books on philosophy, including Humanism A Beginner s Guide and the bestselling Can a Robot be Human 33 Perplexing Philosophy Puzzles.

  • 734 Comments

  • Shortly after I started this, somebody asked me "So, can a robot be human?". It took a lot to get to chapter/puzzle 29 where this is discussed, and now I have no real answer to that question other than some matrix stuff.I'm either too stupid (good chance you will be too) to appreciate how each short "puzzle" is so interesting or I lack the background in philosophy to get all the faces of the die or to care about them. At the end of the book there is a list of suggested readings for each puzzle, [...]


  • With 33 chapters squeezed into fewer than 200 pages, Peter Cave's absorbing journey into philosophy very much keeps the emphasis on brevity and fun, but also serves as a genuinely interesting primer for anyone who has ever been fascinated by those ethical dilemmas and logical paradoxes that life intermittently throws up. Written with wit and knowledge, you'll find that the chapters fly by. Clearly this isn't some philosophy heavyweight but as an introduction, it's accessible, fun and achieves wh [...]


  • I'd highly recommend this an introduction to 'what philosophy is' for teenagers or laypeople. I read this well before my university and job interviews and I think it steered me towards answering those 'unanswerable but we want to see how your approach' questions.Would make a good present for people who 'think too much', 'think abstractly', 'like talking about their dreams or shower thoughts'.It makes problematic ethical and epistemological situations easy to understand, visualize, read and enjoy [...]


  • Enjoying this book, its a good one to read with other people so you can have a good debate. Love how you can pick up and read it from anywhere depending on how much you want to read will definitly leave you pondering





  • When I first picked up this book I thought it was going to be a 5*. But in the end it irritated me so much that I gave up after 5 chapters. So why a 3* and not something lower: because I am prepared to give it the benefit of the doubt that it discusses some interesting philosophical (mostly moral) questions in a light-hearted way – I just didn't like the flippant style. I don't know much about philosophy but I found some of the arguments rather simplistic also, but that could just have been th [...]


  • Short and fun to read. Not for those looking to plumb great depths but a good buffet of food-for-thought for aspiring armchair philosophers. The chapters are small, peppered with witty quips yet covering many moral quandaries and logical singularities. Since the chapters are so short and fun, one may be tempted to rush through the book at one go, but its better to chew one chapter at a time and give it some time to sink in before moving on to the next.Few of the chapters though might feel repeti [...]


  • Not overly impressed by the book. I think that’s more to do with how I found the construction of philosophical arguments rather than any particular criticism of Cave’s abilities. To expand on that, it was basically a load of old film-flam and verbal slight of hand ignoring some convenient physical realities. Probably the best example of this is the race between Mr T (the tortoise) and Achilles. Cave showed that Mr T could never be beaten in a race with Achilles, which I’m sure you’ll agr [...]


  • A light read and fun introduction to philosophical puzzles in a "choose your own adventure" style where the end of chapter gives you to two or three options of other related* chapters to read next.*The follow-on chapters are related to the previous one you read in different ways. So, for example, if one chapter dealt with multiple dimensions, existentialism and ethics, you would pick the next chapter you want to read based on whichever of those topics interested you most about what you just read [...]


  • In a very similar vein to The pig that wants to be eaten by J Baggini. Separate chapters that make you think about the way you think about things, and often you may end up questioning what you really do believe and whether it is consistent. Not as detailed as Justice by Sandell (which is excellent), but a good book to dip into and read a chapter every now and then, as opposed to reading straight through.


  • I thought this book was actually quite enjoyable, and the only criticism I might have for it is that for people who don't particularly care about the religious side o things, it's really hard to actually be interested in the it, because it just doesn't engage your interests. The rest of the book however was very good, it was thought provoking, and Cave's lightness of touch makes it all the more enjoyable.


  • Short chapters describing puzzles, it's not a "serious" philosophy book. Rather it's an entertaining book meant for people to get interested in philosophy. Not bad, just a tad trivial, the writing style could be better but it could be worse too.


  • A very light read as an introduction to philosophy via simple, but occasionally thought-provoking, ideas. The author's own prejudices show through, but some good conversation starters nonetheless (even if they are the sort of conversations one might have in the pub).


  • Nicely written short chapters, each starting with short thought provoking stories. Quick revision of best philosophy thought experiments.



  • Haven't thoroughly read this book, and have rather dipped in and out - at those puzzles that took my fancy. Think I'll have to revisit this one.


  • Decent beginner's guide to philosophy, but it gets sort of wordy and stops making sense about halfway through.


  • A fun and amusing book that will also make you think.Probably a book that everyone should read; packed full of moral dilemmas & important questions.




  • very very fun. short chapters, each chapter independent so when you have 10 minutes pick it up for a fun thought, or a "p" times three (perplexing philosophy puzzle).


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